History of the Bank  
  - Community 1st Bank Las Vegas originally opened on December 17, 1949, at 517 6th Street, as the First National Bank in Las Vegas.  In 2005, the bank changed its banking charter from a national to a state bank to better reflect its role in serving northeastern New Mexico.  On June 27, 2011, the bank moved its main office 100 yards up the street to 600 Douglas Ave. occupying the entire Crockett Building, more commonly known as the home of Murphey’s Drug Store.  
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- With 7 locations to serve our customers on-the-ground, and with this great website to serve our customers anywhere in the world, we feel that we have all the bases covered with our wide-range of products and our excellent customer service. The bank was started and continues to adhere to the philosophy of serving the people and businesses that call this corner of New Mexico home. We invite all to stop by and see how we can help them with their banking needs. 
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- Community 1st Bank is part of FNB Financial Corp which is a locally owned and operated by Ray and Joyce Litherland & family. The Bank was established by a group of local investors led by Joyce’s father the late Ivan Hilton 60 years ago.  With assets in excess of $180 million, the company operates six banking offices concentrating in serving the needs of customers in Northeast New Mexico and provides a comprehensive line of banking services products to consumers, businesses and institutions in the counties it serves. Community 1st Bank has branches in San Miguel, Mora, Harding and Guadalupe Counties.   
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- History of the Crockett Building 
- The Crockett Building was designed as a mixture of the many different styles that the locally famous Rapp brothers had utilized in their career as architects. Influenced by the La Castaneda Hotel's Mission Revival styling, the Rapp's used tin roofing with a clay-tile appearance to top the oriel windows and capped the corners of the building with minimalist Missionesque parapet corner towers.  
 
- Built on the site and foundation of the grand St. Nicholas Hotel, on the prominent corner of Sixth and Douglas Streets, William L. Crockett built one of the largest commercial structures in "new town" Las Vegas, New Mexico. The buff-brick Crockett Block was built in 1899, replacing one of the last large frame structures in New Town. The prolific Rapp brothers were the visionaries for what is likely Las Vegas' most eclectic architectural design. More than any other building in Las Vegas, the Crockett Block building became the focal point for a "downtown", as two street railway lines passed in a curvilinear fashion in front of the building. 
 
William L. Crockett was born around 1852 in Somerset County, Maryland. By 1880, he had moved to New Mexico and became a sheep farmer at the Gallinas Crossing Ranch, south of Las Vegas. He translated his successes as a shepherd into retiring as a landlord of his Crockett Block. His block of suites for rent was soon filled with the offices of many of the elite businesses in town. By 1903, physician attorney Andrieus A. Jones, physician B.D. Black, Business Men's Protective Association, Colorado Telephone & Telegraph Co., J.M. Cunningham, professor Thomas D. Raly, insurance agent G.H. Dinkel, First National Bank, stenographer William E. Gortner, dentist E.L. Hammand, and druggist Edward G. Murphey to name a few prior tenants - the number of business offices in the Crockett Block exhibits its enormous size, as well as its importance to the business community. 
 
The name that has the strongest association with the Crockett Building was and still is Edward G. Murphey's Drug Store at 600 Douglas Street. Murphey was born in 1857 and, as a young man, was a druggist for the Northern Illinois Hospital for the Insane in Elgin, Illinois. A bachelor his entire life, Murphey dedicated himself to his store in the Crockett Block Building and expanded his enterprise to include bookselling and the postcard business. In this regard, Murphey became one of Las Vegas' most important photographers in addition to his druggist duties. Though he died in 1920, the Crockett Block bears his business name today. 
 
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